Although Based on the book, Isaac Newton: Reluctant Genius,

Although this is not common knowledge, as a scholar, Isaac Newton was rated the lowest in class, but with perseverance, he became the man we know today. Based on the Julian Calendar, Isaac Newton was born on Christmas of 1642 in Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire a small town in England. He was a frail baby and not expected to live. Unfortunately for Newton, his father died months before his birth. And starting at a very young age, Newton was left with his grandmother, while his mother left with her new family (“Isaac Newton”). As a young boy, he attended the King’s School in Grantham, Lincolnshire. According to D.C. Ipsen, author of Isaac Newton: Reluctant Genius, Newton was rated to be the lowest in his class. He was far more interested in making small inventions that fascinated him. But what lead him to change, was a fight with his fellow classmate, he challenged himself to study, and in a flash, Isaac Newton was at the top of the class. But after studying for four years at the King’s School in Grantham, his mother had called him for assistance with the farm, entirely stopping his education. Fortunately after two years, his mother had finally decided to return him to the King’s School in Grantham, after loads and loads of convincing by her brother, who was also the headmaster of the school, after recognizing the genius in him. Based on the book, Isaac Newton: Reluctant Genius, by D.C. Ipsen, after finding Newton under a hedge working on mathematics when he should have been doing farm chores, the headmaster suggested that his studious nephew should attend Cambridge University. ┬áIn the year 1661 Newton joined Cambridge, at the time he was 18. During his time there, he would often conduct experiments, once, an experiment almost ruined his vision permanently. In 1665, Newton earned a degree and graduated, but he intended to continue his studies. Unfortunately there were some events that kept him away from his studies, such as the Great Plague which hit Cambridge in the summer of 1665. But during his absence from Cambridge, he came up with one of the most revolutionary theories in science.