To out about the tragic killing of Tom Robinson,

To Kill a Mockingbird is a story that takes place in a small town located in Alabama during the Great Depression. The book focuses on Jean Louise “Scout” and Jeremy Atticus “Jem” and their coming of age. Harper Lee uses symbolism in her novel to translate her ideas, the most notable symbol: The mockingbird.  There is a common misinterpretation of the meaning behind the metaphor leading many to believe that the Finch children are meant to be perceived as the mockingbirds. It is widely known that the mockingbird is meant to represent purity and innocence, making many think that the children were meant to be perceived as the mockingbirds because innocence was a character trait they shared. The mockingbird does not just symbolize innocence, though this is a big part of the metaphor, but also represents a person who was harmed by society in some way even though he or she had done no wrong. Atticus Finch said after giving his children air rifles that they could “shoot all the blue jays you want but to remember, that it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird”.(Lee 117) To kill a mockingbird is like stripping the innocence from someone and Atticus meant by saying “it’s a sin”(Lee 117) that to harm someone who is innocent is cruel, especially when no benefit is gained. Harper Lee wanted Tom Robinson and Boo Radley to be portrayed as mockingbirds, birds recognized for their innocence and purity, yet also targeted. Body Paragraph #1Topic Sentence #1: Tom Robinson, a black man convicted of rape, was an example of a Mockingbird because he was targeted even though he was innocent. Integrated Evidence #1: After the town of Maycomb found out about the tragic killing of Tom Robinson, “Mr. Underwood likened Tom’s death to the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children”(Lee 323) in an editorial.Analysis 1: Tom Robinson was wrongfully accused of raping Mayella Ewell. Tom never caused Mayella or anybody else harm; he was a hardworking man who worked for Mayella whenever she asked without requesting a reward for his services. According to Tom’s testimony, Mayella had kissed him, and because she feared her reputation would be destroyed more than it already was, she lied about what had happened. Tom was an innocent man, good and pure, who was unfairly targeted because of his skin color like a bird targeted for its beautiful feathers. There is no justification to kill a songbird (such as a Mockingbird) just as there is no justification to have killed someone who was innocent like Tom. Integrated Evidence #2: Miss Maudie said: “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy…they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us.”(Lee 119). She clarified this for Scout after Scout had asked why Atticus had said: “remember it’s a sin to kill a Mockingbird”(Lee 119).Analysis 2: Tom went out of his way to help Mayella when she asked for it. He had pure intentions, to help someone who he “felt right sorry for”(Lee 265). Most people looked down upon the Ewells but Tom was able to look past their reputation and treat Mayella Ewell with the respect she had never received from anybody else. He was able to empathize with the nineteen-year-old when nobody else could. All he did was make her feel respected and for this, he was put on trial and killed. To kill him was like killing a Mockingbird because he brought good to the world and even though he was innocent, he was targeted like a Mockingbird is for its pretty feathers.Body Paragraph #2 Topic Sentence #2: Boo Radley, a recluse, is the other Mockingbird in the novel because he brought goodness to the town though he was misunderstood his entire life.Integrated Evidence #1: At the end of the novel Scout thought to herself  “Boo is our neighbor. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a knife, and our lives”(Lee 373) when she realized he had been misunderstood his whole life.Analysis 1: The rumor that Jem told in the beginning of the novel was that Boo Radley was an evil, six and a half foot tall person who dined on raw squirrels and cats. In reality, he is quite the opposite of the tall tale, looking after the Finch children from a distance as if they were his own. Whenever he saw that Scout and Jem were upset, he would leave a gift for them to find and enjoy in the tree in front of his home. Not only did he leave presents for Scout and Jem, but when Miss Maudie’s home was burning to the ground in the frigid winter, he gave Scout a blanket. When Jem,