Vy The livelihood and statuses of Japan changed during

Vy Nguyen Ms. Redmond ILA 8 January 22th, 2018 The Effects of WW2 on Japan and Modern World Postwar influences of World War 2 changed Japan and the modern world, shaping our environment, and Japan’s into the way it is now. The livelihood and statuses of Japan changed during and after World War 2, including economic, cultural, political, and personal changes. During WW2, Japan joined the Axis Alliance along with Italy and Germany. Japan’s decision to join Axis Alliance shaped the war and the future of multiple countries. While Japan was altering many aspects of their nation, many other nations were also involved in this postwar era.  Japan’s involvement in the Axis Alliance embodied many possible outcomes of the war. Along with Italy and Germany, Japan recognized German preeminence over most of continental Europe, Italian supremacy over the Mediterranean Sea, and Japanese authority over East Asia and the Pacific. The Axis Alliance demanded territorial expansion, along with the destruction or neutralization of Soviet Communism. On November 25, 1936 Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan signed the Anti-Comintern Pact, addressed against the Soviet Union and the international Communist movement. On July 7th 1937, Japan invaded China, which initiated WW2 in the Pacific. Soon after, Italy, Germany, and Japan signed the Tripartite Act on September 27th 1940, officially establishing the Axis alliance.  Following the signing of the Tripartite Act, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7th 1941, which tensed the declaration of war on the United States. On December 8th 1941, the US validated the declaration of war on Japan, entering into WW2. Accompanying with current events, the Axis Partners declared war on the United States on December 11–13, 1941.  Soon after, Japanese troops infested the Philippines, French Indochina (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia), and British Singapore territories. By April 1942, the Philippines, Indochina, and British Singapore are under Japanese authority.